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March 2017 Archives

What happens if my R-1 Visa status changes?

These are uncertain times for any foreign-born person in the United States or trying to get in. As we noted in a post earlier this year, there are many reasons someone might be entering the U.S. and specifically coming to Kentucky. These can include such things as working for a local religious denomination – perhaps as an educator at a seminary or as a minister at a church.

The road to a green card can be long

For many immigrants in Kentucky, getting a green card represents the peak and pinnacle of their desires. Having that card means you are welcome in the United States, granted permanent residency. Perhaps the next step after that will be full naturalization so that you can enjoy the full rights of U.S. citizenship. The green card opens up an array of possibilities.

Do you qualify for an employment visa?

Each fiscal year, the United States government grants 140,000 employment visas. If your education, skills and work experience fall into one of the five employment visa categories, you could obtain the right to reside here. Of course, you must meet all of the other qualifications required for entry into the country.

What can I as an undocumented immigrant do to protect my rights?

The current environment regarding immigration is unpredictable. Whether you live in Kentucky or any other state, if you are an undocumented immigrant or know someone who is, what could happen next is one big question mark. Even when your legal status is solid, the desire to avoid deportation can cause worry. In uncertain times, fear only increases.

Immigrant faces deportation in underage sex case

Immigrants in Kentucky who have permanent residency may be interested to hear that on Feb. 27, the Supreme Court heard a case that had to do with a permanent resident who was facing deportation. The man had been convicted in California after having sex with his 16-year-old girlfriend. He was 20 and 21 at the time, and according to California law, if an individual is under 18 and there is more than a three-year age difference with the person they are having sex with, the act is criminal.

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